🌳 10 December 2019 🌸☀ 🌸☀
Your RCF daily Jo’burg weather

Today 2018 Avg
High 17 °C 20°C 26°C
Low 13°C 12°C 13°C

Cloudy and cooler with a couple of showers

🌤 Sunrise 05:08
🌙 Sunset 18:52
☀ Midday 12:00
🌘 Midnight 00:00
⏳ Length of day 13:45

✍🏼 *The EXTRA-BIT of useful/useless info* 👇🏼

FYI…
It’s that tine of the year where midday and midnight are actually at the stroke of 12:00.  Check the table above.

Today’s Extra-Bit
We have a peek at another festival, this time in Turkey.  The Whirling Dervishes

Men dressed in whites robes and tall hats spinning in circles doesn’t sound as exciting as running with the bulls or dancing at Rio’s Carnival, but the chance to watch the Whirling Dervishes will change you in a way you’d never expect. Based on the teachings and practices of the 13th-century poet Rumi, this 10-day festival will expose you to the power of devotion and show you that spinning can do more than just make you dizzy.

Everyone is familiar with the image of the whirling dervish, clad completely in white and spinning expertly as if in a trance. However, the dervish is much more than a visual spectacle, dating back over 700 years as part of Sufism and the Mevlevi Order. We take a look at the history of the dervish, their beliefs, and the significance of the whirling ritual.
Of the numerous orders of Islam, Sufism is defined as the inner and mystical dimension. The Mevlevi Order was formed in 1312 in the Turkish city of Konya (formerly the capital of the Anatolian Seljuk Sultanate) by the followers of the 13th century Persian poet, Islamic theologian, and Sufi mystic Jalāl ad-Dīn Muhammad Rūmī (or Mevlânâ). Organized by Mevlânâ’s son, Sultan Walad, the order in Konya soon began to expand into other towns with appointed leaders, and in its heyday there were 114 tekke (sort of monasteries) established throughout the Ottoman Empire, including ones in Belgrade, Athens, Cairo, Mecca, Baghdad, Damascus, and Tabriz.

With the fall of the Ottoman Empire after WWI, the Sufi organizations were declared illegal, and the tekkes were either closed down, adapted into mosques, or turned into museums. Two of the most important remaining Mevlevihane are the ones in Konya (where Mevlânâ is buried) and the Galata Mevlevihanesi in Istanbul. By 1953 public performances of the Mevlevi Sema, or the Whirling Prayer Ceremony, were permitted by the Turkish government, and soon large crowds came from all over the world to watch displays organized by the Ministry of Culture and Tourism.

 

Kind regards, Zubair
Ridgeway Community Forum